Boots and shoes FAQS

Are Tyndale’s boots Electric Hazard (EH) Rated?
How is a boot EH rated?
What about ANSI Z41 PT99 – isn’t that the standard for protective footwear?
What are the differences between the old ANSI Z41 PT99 boot standard and the new ASTM F2412-05 boot standard?
Tyndale offers several steel toe boots. What protection does that provide to the wearer?
What type of work is a composite toe boot best suited for?
What is a steel shank and when is it used?
What is a composite shank?
What about boot height – are there specific requirements?
What’s the difference between insulated and waterproof boots?
How do I know which overshoe size to order?

How are boot widths measured? How do I know which boots I need to buy?
Does Tyndale offer women's sized boots?

I am a woman and am thinking about purchasing a men's sized boot.  How should I proceed?


Are Tyndale’s boots Electric Hazard (EH) Rated?

Yes. All of the boots Tyndale sells are EH Rated and meet the requirements of ASTM F2413–05, specification for performance requirements for protective footwear. Most utilities require their workers to wear EH Rated boots. And, NFPA 70E 2009 has a provision for foot protection for hazard risk category 2 and higher.

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How is a boot EH rated?

A boot is filled with steel BBs, and placed on a steel plate. A positive electric wire is placed in the BBs, and a negative is connected to the steel plate. The test measures how much current can travel through the sole of the boot. EH rated boots have been tested and found to offer sufficient resistance to electric currents up to 600 volts.

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What about ANSI Z41 PT99 – isn’t that the standard for protective footwear?

The American National Standard’s Institute Z41 Committee on Personal Protection – Protective Footwear has merged into ASTM International’s Committee F13. With this merger, F13 oversees the redrafting of ANSI Z41 performance requirements and test method standards for protective footwear. The ANSI Z41 standard has been withdrawn and the ASTM standards – F2412-05 and F2413-05 now provide the industry standard for protective footwear. The ASTM standards incorporate nearly all the information from the old ANSI Standard, as well as expand on testing methods.

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What are the differences between the old ANSI Z41 PT99 boot standard and the new ASTM F2412-05 boot standard?

ANSI Z41 PT99 and ASTM F2412-05 are similar in nearly every aspect.There are only two major differences between them.Whereas ANSI Z41 divides static dissipative boots into Type 1 (lower resistance limit of no more than 10 8 ohms) and Type 2 (lower resistance limit of no more than 10 9 ohms), the ASTM standard eliminates “types” and instead specifies that footwear must have an electrical resistance with a lower limit of 10 6 ohms and an upper limit of 10 8 ohms.The other difference is that, in the ANSI standard, compression resistance ratings are given of 75, 50, and 30, which correlate to 2500 pounds, 1750 pounds, and 1000 pounds of compression.The ASTM standard eliminates the lowest compression category, Class 30 (1000 pounds). So, all compliant footwear must either be Class 75 and Class 50.

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Tyndale offers several steel toe boots. What protection does that provide to the wearer?

Steel toe boots provide a steel protective covering over the toe, which protects the wearer from injury - meeting ASTM standard F2412-05 for impact and compression. Steel toes are generally required by most industries, but are uncomfortable for people who walk long distances (like meter readers) and difficult for those who go through metal detectors in the course of their daily work (like nuclear workers). These workers might instead use composite toe boots, which are non-metal plates protecting the foot.Tyndale offers many boots with steel toe and several with composite toe.

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What type of work is a composite toe boot best suited for?

A composite toe boot is a non-metallic, non-magnetic protective covering over the toe, which resists corrosion and serves the same function as the steel toe. Tyndale’s composite toe boot meets ASTM standard F2412-05 for impact and compression - except it does not set off metal detectors. Tyndale offers a single composite toe boot, well suited for workers who must go through metal detectors at work or workers exposed to extremely cold temperatures.

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What is a steel shank and when is it used?

This is a metal plate in the sole of the boot that makes it more comfortable for a worker to stand for a long time on a narrow peg. It provides extra support for the foot, and is used for climbing utility poles. Tyndale offers several steel shank boots.

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What is a composite shank?

A composite shank is a non-metal plate in the sole of the boot, serving the same function as a steel shank. Tyndale offers one composite shank boot – it’s EH rated and provides protection against impact and compression.

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What about boot height – are there specific requirements?

This is the height that the boot goes up the wearer's leg. Most utility work requires a minimum boot height of 6". All of the boots that Tyndale sells are at least 6” high – and we offer several climbing boots with an 8” height.

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What's the difference between insulated and waterproof boots?

Insulated boots are lightweight, quick-drying with moisture resistant insulation that helps to keep feet warm.  Waterproof boots offer seam-sealed construction and waterproof leather and help to keep feet dry.

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How do I know which overshoe sizes to order?

If you typically order a size 9 shoe, order a size 9 overshoes.  Overshoes are meant to fit over the size shoe you usually wear.

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How are boot widths measured?  How do I know which boots I need to buy?

If you typically require a "wide width" shoe, you will also need a "wide width" boot.  Boots typically come in Medium (M) and Wide (W or EE).  Most manufacturers refer to wide boots as W; Carhartt refers to wide boots as EE.

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Does Tyndale offer women's sized boots?

Yes, Tyndale offers women's boots with protective toes and recommends purchasing these instead of men's boots when a protective toe is needed.

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I am a woman and am thinking about purchasing a men's sized boot.  How should I proceed?

Tyndale does not recommend that women purchase men's sized boots when a protective toe is needed.  As a woman, if you are ordering boots without protective toes, you may consider ordering men's boots for more options.  Typically, you would need to order one-and-a-half (1-1/2) to two (2) sizes smaller than your usual size, depending on the manufacturer.  For example, if you are usually a size 8 in women's shoes, you would need to order a men's size 6 or 6-1/2.  If you have any questions about boot sizing, please call Tyndale Customer Service at 800-356-3433.  

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